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China surpasses the United States in carbon dioxide emissions due to fossil fuel use and cement production.

 

2006, June

 

At 1.66 billion metric tons of carbon in 2006, the People's Republic of China has surpassed the United States as the world's largest emitter of CO2 due to fossil-fuel use and cement production. According to reported energy statistics, coal production and use in China has increased ten-fold since the early 1960s. As a result, Chinese fossil-fuel CO2 emissions have grown 79.2% since 2000. China is the world's largest coal producer, which accounted for 98.7% of the carbon dioxide emissions in 1950 and 72.9% in 2006. Due to the massive increase in infrastructure projects and housing construction cement production has become increasingly important as a source of CO2 emissions.
In 2006, cement production accounts for almost 10% of China's total industrial CO2 emissions.

 

Literature:

Boden, T.A. / G. Marland / Andres, R.J. (2009): Global, Regional, and National Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge, Tenn., U.S.A. doi 10.3334/CDIAC/00001

 

 

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china-profile.com - 18 April 2012