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Timeline: Chronology of Political Key Events

All Events

1950s

1960s

1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s

Policy

Economy

Science

Technology

Environm.

Society

Culture

Military

Health

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Education

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Other

 

P

1949, Oct.: Proclamation of the People's Republic of China. External Link

 

P

1949, Dec.: Mao Zedong travels to Moscow to negotiate a friendship treaty with Joseph Stalin. External Link

 

The 1950s

 

P

1950, Feb.: China and the Soviet Union sign "Sino-Soviet Treaty of Friendship, Alliance, and Mutual Assistance". External Link

 

P

1951: Vatican and China break off diplomatic relations.

 

P

1951: United Nations places a global arms embargo on China because China's involvement in Korean War.

 

P

1956-1957: "Hundred Flowers" campaign misleads intellectuals to complain about problems.

 

P

1957-1958: "Anti-Rightist" Campaign is used by Mao to eliminate critical intellectuals.

 

P

1958: Begin of the "Great Leap Forward" campaign. Ashton, et al. (1984)

 

P

1959: Sino-Soviet relations deteriorate dramatically. The Soviet Union is restricting transfer of science and technology to China. External Link Wikipedia

 

The 1960s

 

P

1964, Jan.: China and France establish diplomatic relations. Taiwan's embassy in Paris is closed. External Link

 

P

1965: Tibet becomes autonomous region. External Link

 

P

1966: The "Little Red Book". Climax of Mao-cult.

 

P

1966-1976: Mao's political concept of a "permanent cultural revolution" paralyzes his political enemies.

 

P

1966-1976: The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution - a decade lost in anarchy and chaos.

 

P

1969: Mao Zedong anoints Lin Biao as his heir apparent. External Link US Library of Congress, Country Profile: China. Feb. 20050

 

The 1970s

 

P

1970-1976: "Gang of Four" with Mao's wife is trying to get influence by spearheading the "Cultural Revolution".

 

P

1970-1976: Mao Zedong is increasingly disappearing from public life due to health problems.

 

P

1971, July: Henry Kissinger secretly visits China.

 

P

1971, Sept.: Lin Biao is killed in airplane crash while fleeing after an attempted military coup.

 

P

1971, Nov.: The People's Republic replaces the Republic of China (Taiwan) in UN Security Council. External Link

 

P

1972, Feb.: Visit of US President Richard Nixon to China. Normalization between US and China begins. External Link

 

P

1973: The rivalry between the USSR and China now affects every aspect their foreign policy. US Central Intelligence Agency (1973): Possible Changes in the Sino-Soviet Relationship. National Intelligence Estimate.

 

P

1976, Jan.: Death of Premier Zhou Enlai.

 

P

1976, Sept.: Chairman Mao Zedong dies at the age of 82. "Gang of Four" with Mao's widow tries to get into power. External Link BBC News.0

 

P

1977: Deng Xiaoping wins the power struggle after Mao's death.

 

P

1978-1979: "Democracy Wall" in Beijing with pro-democratic posters.

 

P

1979: Diplomatic relations are established between the US and China.

 

P

1979, Jan.: U.S. President Jimmy Carter visits China.

 

The 1980s

 

P

1980: Early 1980s: Debates between "Reds" who favour ideological correctness and "Technocrats" who promote pragmatic reform.

 

P

1984, Jan.: China joins the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) External Link

 

P

1984, April: State Council authorizes Yangtze Valley Planning Office to draft feasibility report for Three Gorges Dam project. External Link

 

P

1985-1988: "Cultural Fever": Intellectuals identify China's "feudal" traditions as reason for backwardness.

 

P

1986: Thousands of students all over China are demonstrating for greater intellectual freedom.

 

P

1987, Jan.: The too "liberal" General Secretary of China's Communist Party, Hu Yaobang, is forced to resign External Link Wikipedia.0

 

P

1988: By mid-1988 the CCP annouces that its membership has increased to the all-time high of 47 million.

 

P

1989: Jiang Zemin replaces Zhao Ziyang as CCP General Secretary.

 

P

1989, April: Hu Yaobang dies. External Link

 

P

1989, June: Crack down of Tiananmen Square demonstrations with military power (official death toll: 200) External Link Wikipedia, BBC

 

P

1989, June: In Madrid (Spain), the European Council of Ministers agrees to an EU-wide arms embargo against China.

 

The 1990s

 

P

1990-2006: Waves of public protests, particularly in rural areas, are concerning the Chinese government. External Link Tanner, Murray Scot (2006)

 

P

1997, Feb.: Death of Deng Xiaoping. External Link BBC News.0

 

P

1997, July: China gets control over Hong Kong's sovereignty. External Link CIA, The World Fact Book, 20060

 

P

1998: Zhu Rongji follows Li Peng as China's Premier.

 

P

1999: Cooling of US-China relations after NATO bombs Chinese embassy in Belgrade, former Yugoslavia.

 

The 2000s

 

P

2001, April: Major diplomatic crisis after US spy plane collides with Chinese fighter jet in mid-air and is forced to land.

 

P

2001, June: Growing tension across the Taiwan Strait.

 

P

2002, Feb.: US President George W. Bush visits China.

 

P

2002, Nov.: Hu Jintao replaces Jiang Zemin as head of the Communist Party.

 

P

2003, March: Hu Jintao is elected as President by National People's Congress.

 

P

2004, Oct.: China signes agreement with Russia setteling their long-lasting border conflicts. External Link US Library of Congress, Country Profile: China. Feb. 20050

 

P

2006, Feb.: Prominent elderly leaders protest in open letter against the Communist Party's secretive propaganda department. The New York Times, Feb. 15, 2006

 

P

2008, Feb.: U.S. Justice Department announces that several individuals are being charged with spying for China.

 

P

2008, March: Most violent ethnic protest in years erupt in Lhasa, Tibet's main city. External Link

 

P

2008, March: Xinhua reports 19 deaths in public unrest at Tibet's capital Lhasa. External Link

 

P

2008, Aug.: Hua Guofeng dies in Beijing aged 87.

 

P

2009, July: Almost 200 people die and over 1,700 are injured in ethnic violence in Xinjiang. External Link BBC

 

P

2009, July: China demands that new personal computers come with filtering software "Green Dam Youth Escort". External Link

 

P

2009, Oct.: Mass celebrations to mark 60 years of Communist Party rule over China.

 

P

2010, Jan.: Google announces it will stop self-censoring its Internet search engine in China. External Link The Wall Street Journal

 

P

2010, March: Google stops its Chinese Internet search engine and re-routes mainland Chinese users to its Hong Kong site. External Link The Wall Street Journal

 

P

2010, Oct.: Communist Party elders critizise censorship. External Link The Wall Street Journal

 

P

2010, Oct.: Jailed Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo wins 2010 Nobel Peace Price External Link BBC

 

P

2010, Oct.: Xi Jinping is appointed a vice chairman of the party's Central Military Commission External Link WSJ, BBC

 

P

2011, Jan.: Violent protests in southern fishing village of Wukan against land seizures by officials. External Link The Guardian, BBC

 

P

2011, April: The Chinese artist Ai Weiwei is arrested for "economic crimes". External Link

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china-profile.com - 18 April 2012